Blockchain Powers Avocados From Mexico’s Super Bowl 2020 Campaign

Blockchain Powers Avocados From Mexico’s Super Bowl 2020 Campaign

Blockchain News
February 7, 2020 Editor's Desk
1104
For Super Bowl 2020, Avocados From Mexico (AFM) consolidated blockchain technology over its digital advertising assets, remunerating customer engagement with “digital avocados” and creating 53,000 registrations for its nascent loyalty program. “We’re aware that we are the smallest player in the sandbox with the giants of advertising. So we needed to be very agile and
Super Bowl 2020 Avocados

For Super Bowl 2020, Avocados From Mexico (AFM) consolidated blockchain technology over its digital advertising assets, remunerating customer engagement with “digital avocados” and creating 53,000 registrations for its nascent loyalty program.

“We’re aware that we are the smallest player in the sandbox with the giants of advertising. So we needed to be very agile and creative and come up with something very disruptive,” Ivonne Kinser, AFM’s head of digital marketing, states Marketing Daily.

AFM associated with Reeve Collins, co-founder of Vatom Labs, a platform for the production and distribution of blockchain-based objects described Vatoms. Among other technology tries, Collins co-founded the blockchain cryptocurrency named Tether.

Leading among AFM’s campaign challenges was to be disruptive enough to pierce through the Super Bowl ad confusion while generating more than just social media and video impressions and being available to as many fans as possible.

“It was extremely risky to do a Super Bowl campaign — when you want to appeal to America, every demographic — and do something too niche. So we created two experiences,” Kinser states.

The more mainstream part of the campaign, which started on Jan. 16 and ended Feb. 2, continued singularly on Twitter. Users retweeting AFM’s campaign tweets, and “tweeting their love for AFM” employing the hashtag #AvoNetwork, were likely to win prizes.

In the second element, users who enrolled with an email address generated digital wallets in which they could save Vatoms (a.k.a. “digital avocados”) obtained by performing specific actions. Those included following the brand’s social channels, sharing AFM news with friends, and watching the company’s Super Bowl television ad in its entirety. A novel URL for each registrant’s wallet aided engagement tracking.

AFM also collaborated with a notable, unidentified grocery retailer so that registrants could supplement digital avocados to their wallet while shopping. Each digital avocado they gained afforded registrants entry in a daily $1,000 sweepstakes, leading up to a $15,000 grand prize awarded on Super Bowl Sunday.

“We’re already concepting our next campaign with the same technology, but we’re going to reinvent it and keep it fresh,” says Kinser. “We have 53,000 registrations that are the beginning of the loyalty program that we’re building. [Consumers] can leverage their avocado currency in our next campaign to get whatever we concept.”

Each year following the Super Bowl, marketing agency Merkle estimates the struggles of game advertisers to enlarge consumer engagement with their TV ads over social media, organic and paid search, and digital media. This year, Merkle stood AFM #2 behind TurboTax.

Related posts

Add a comment